In Search of Yourself: Vision Quest

Have you ever gone in search of yourself, a vision quest wondering what your purpose is in this life? You have had expectations placed on you by your family, your friends, even yourself and yet you are unsure… Perhaps you have considered a vision quest to better connect with your purpose. A successful vision quest often comes full circle and leads you to the answer you have somehow already known, deep inside.

Some people will look outside themselves for their answers and ask the questions regarding their purpose and their future. They consult an oracle like a “psychic” or the “cards” (ie Tarot cards,) or the palm reader or tea leaves or other forms of mysticism. Some people use hypnosis or a pendulum to explore the subconscious mind’s wisdom. And, when you use any of these methods your egoic mind may ask if you “trust” the information which you are given in this phase of your vision quest. The problem with the “egoic mind” is that it thinks it knows stuff which it can not possibly know. The mind has limitations and can only see in three dimensions. This does not account for vision which can go beyond these three dimensions and may include Divine Guidance.

Have you ever had that “unexplainable feeling” deep in your gut that warns you of danger or attracts you to a special person or incredible experience. Perhaps there is no “rational” reason but when you follow this “guidance” you find the amazing awakening or protection or experience of love. Your vision quest comes from this unconscious realm and seeks to find the light of consciousness you can most benefit from experiencing. In my life, I have come to the crossroads many times and wound up following the most beneficial path. (Not always the easiest or least challenging, but the best path for me to travel.)

Deep within YOU dwells the answers you seek. Most of the people you may bump into seem to keep their heads down not looking to the horizon and so missing out on the experiences they most need to have. You must prepare yourself and quiet the fears of the egoic mind so you can “Feel” and then “Know” the answers. Your vision quest comes from the gift of spiritual guidance and your connection to the collective wisdom of the divine. You must become quiet and allow this wisdom to bubble up in the most respectful way. Your meditation will allow you to connect with the seemingly subtle source of your divinity. When you do awaken, you will feel that the answer is familiar and a sensation of “remembering” this wisdom will enter your consciousness (because deep inside you already know…)

I was given a book by my dear friends, Curt and Mary, which speaks very clearly regarding the Native American tradition of the Vision Quest. “Quest: A Guide for Creating Your Own Vision Quest,” by Denise and Meadow Linn (and published by Hay House,) offers you many ways to best prepare yourself and then to create a special experience which will allow you to access the information you seek. There are other books on this topic or which touch on this topic but this recent gift is in the very front of my consciousness. (Amazon link to this book: https://www.amazon.com/Quest-Guide-Creating-Your-Vision/dp/1401938779/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1525460557&sr=8-1&keywords=quest+a+guide+for+creating+your+own+vision+quest

One of your main challenges in this life is to become the most conscious soul you can be and then to share the wisdom of your journey to assist fellow pilgrims.

If you are READY and looking for a supportive community where you can share your story, your wisdom, and grow spiritually in a non-religious environment, consider Masters of the Journey.
You are a Blessing! You are a Master! Your wisdom from your life experience can have great value to other pilgrims on the path toward awakening and enlightenment.

The Masters of the Journey has events which are updated on our Facebook page which is found at: www.facebook.com/mastersofthejourney Please comment on this blog and share, if appropriate. More of our blogs are based on spiritual consciousness and can be found at www.dstress.com/blog

Strategies for Hiring Winners: Executive Summary

Would you like to avoid hiring mistakes, if possible? The following are tips from executives interviewed especially for this article.

The secret to hiring “winners” is:
Know the job and your company’s culture, then find the correct person to fill the job.

Hiring mistakes are very costly. Estimates range from 1-10 times the annual salaries, with the general consensus being 3 times the annual salary. This is based on recruiting and training the wrong candidate (the mistake), waiting for the productivity that does not come, removing the person, dealing with morale and sabotage, replacing and training the next candidate. If you have an engineer or mid-level manager that earns $80,000 – $100,000 this can be a cost to your company of $240,000 to $300,000 for just one mistake!

90% of all hiring decisions are made by an interview. Interviewing is 14% accurate according to Michigan State University. This percentage can increase if you have hiring managers that are really well trained or if their intuition is very well developed. The training for interviewers must be extensive because as Victoria Perrault, VP of AFC says, there are “obvious problems” when the hiring interviews are a “fly by the seat of your pants” experience. She is leading AFC into a “Success Profile” approach to benchmark the critical success factors. Yvonne Myers, Director of HR at Legacy Marketing group (a 540 person insurance sales & marketing business), has found results to be “dead on” for their E.Q.I. Profile which creates a “footprint” (benchmark) which helps develop specific interview questions that determine the soft-skill competencies of their candidates for job success. These insure that the candidates will be the “right fit” for their organization.

More companies are assessing the competencies necessary for specific jobs within their specific cultures. Some companies are benchmarking their personnel and selecting the top performers and comparing assessment results with their poorest performers to discover the patterns of success that are required for top production and satisfaction on the job. More fortune 500 companies report that they are using assessments, which is up from 15% in 1985 to 30% in 1996 and expected to hit over 50% by 2002.

The assessments are also used for staff development, planning training, and to aid managers finding the ideal motivation for specific staff members.

Kent Sherwood, CEO of Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, emphasized the need for “integrity” as the highest quality for leadership candidates. He also looks for honesty, reliability, follow through, and straight talking. Good candidates must have the skill set necessary or have the “inclination to learn in a reasonable time” with the appropriate personality to blend with the existing culture.

Fred Philpott, VP of Human Resources for Kendall-Jackson Wine Estates, uses a model to check for winning characteristics which include: A.) Technical/experience B.) Behavior: drive, urgency, ethics, Integrity, open communication, business acumen, global-strategic thinking, teaming-partnering, consensus, quick decisions, C.) Bottomline ability to influence and persuade.

Two of three companies either use recruiters or have used recruiters to get qualified candidates to interview. The other companies rely on internal referral and developing leaders from within the organization (which is a great retention strategy.)

Hiring Winners Checklist:
1. Know the job – skills, experience, soft-skills, competencies. Develop clear expectations.
2. Know your company’s culture (Mission, Vision, Values)
3. Benchmark your top and bottom performers (assess the styles, behaviors and attitudes of your winners!)
4. Develop your interview process to adequately assess candidates’ necessary soft-skills
5. Hire the Right People for the Right Job!
6. Support and develop your key talent. Get them to love your company!
7. Continuously re-assess your hiring process.

W. Edwards Deming said, “If a person is not performing as expected, it is probably because they have been miscast for the job.”

Special thanks to all the business leaders who contributed their business wisdom and experience including (in order of interview dates): Kent Sherwood, CEO of Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa Deborah Meekins, President and CEO of Sonoma National Bank Greg Peters, President and CEO of Mahi Networks Victoria Perrault, VP of Administrative Services of AFC Seritta White, CEO of S.K. White Consulting Fred Philpott, VP of Human Resources of Kendall-Jackson Wine Estates Rob Thorson, Manager of Human Resources of Westamerica Bank Shirley Gordon, VP for Northern California of State Farm Insurance Yvonne Myers, Director of Human Resources of Legacy Marketing Group Martin Grove, District Manager of State Compensation Insurance Fund Paul Herrerias, CEO of Herrerias & Associates

This executive summary is based on interviews and research conducted by L. John Mason, Ph.D. of the Stress Education Center.

For a detailed report on the Hiring Winners and Retaining Key Personnel please contact Dr. Mason at mason@dstress.com or (360) 593-3833. Ask about a proposal for benchmarking your top performers with special assessments that are designed to help you match their behaviors and attitudes with potential new hires.

L. John Mason, Ph.D. is the author of the best selling “Guide to Stress Reduction.” Since 1977, he has offered Executive Coaching and Training.

Please visit the Stress Education Center’s website at http://www.dstress.com for articles, free blog signup, and learn about the new telecourses that are available. If you would like information or a targeted proposal for training or coaching, please contact us at (360) 593-3833.